Cheap Travel Insurance For People With Multiple Sclerosis

WWW.TRAVELINSURANCEMULTIPLESCLEROSIS.CO.UK

With multiple sclerosis you really should take travel insurance out when you go on holiday or travel abroad just in case you fall ill and need medical treatment as the NHS will not provide treatment whilst you are on holiday. The cost of receiving medical treatment outside the UK can be very expensive and the travel insurance will repay most of these costs provided you took it out before you left for your holiday.

In addition if you need assistance to get home, like an ambulance or medical staff to accompany you, then the travel insurance will pay for the costs associated with repatriation too.

For those with pre-existing medical conditions travel insurance can be expensive unless you shop around (this link might help you find cheap travel insurance for people with multiple sclerosis).

Travellers with multiple sclerosis have in the past paid significantly more for their travel insurance as those with multiple sclerosis, like many other sufferers of a pre-existing condition have had their premiums raised. The travel insurance companies consider those that are under the treatment of a doctor, even on a routine basis, may be more likely to claim and hence cause them to have to pay out.

Additional rating factors which effect travel insurance are connected conditions and whether this condition has caused you to cut short or cancel a holiday in the past.

Multiple sclerosis and travel insurance

Multiple sclerosis (MS), also known as disseminated sclerosis or encephalomyelitis disseminata, is an inflammatory disease in which the insulating covers of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are damaged. This damage disrupts the ability of parts of the nervous system to communicate, resulting in a wide range of signs and symptoms, including physical, mental, and sometimes psychiatric problems. MS takes several forms, with new symptoms either occurring in isolated attacks (relapsing forms) or building up over time (progressive forms). Between attacks, symptoms may go away completely; however, permanent neurological problems often occur, especially as the disease advances.

While the cause is not clear, the underlying mechanism is thought to be either destruction by the immune system or failure of the myelin-producing cells. Proposed causes for this include genetics and environmental factors such as infections. MS is usually diagnosed based on the presenting signs and symptoms and the results of supporting medical tests.

A person with MS can have almost any neurological symptom or sign; with autonomic, visual, motor, and sensory problems being the most common. The specific symptoms are determined by the locations of the lesions within the nervous system, and may include loss of sensitivity or changes in sensation such as tingling, pins and needles or numbness, muscle weakness, very pronounced reflexes, muscle spasms, or difficulty in moving; difficulties with coordination and balance (ataxia); problems with speech or swallowing, visual problems (nystagmus, optic neuritis or double vision), feeling tired, acute or chronic pain, and bladder and bowel difficulties, among others. Difficulties thinking and emotional problems such as depression or unstable mood are also common.

All of these factors will be taken into account when you apply for travel insurance with multiple sclerosis.

In addition, those that are waiting for a diagnosis or additional tests face the highest premiums as what insurers’ hate most of all is uncertainty, especially around the possible risk of falling ill abroad with a condition that isn’t yet well controlled.